Skip to content

Why Some Coca-Cola Bottles Have Yellow Caps In The Spring

    Why Some Coca-Cola Bottles Have Yellow Caps In The Spring

    Have you ever spotted those distinctive yellow Coca-Cola bottle caps popping up in the springtime? Wondering what’s the story behind them? It’s pretty simple. Those caps signify that the Coca-Cola bottles are certified Kosher. As Passover draws near, supermarkets fill their aisles with these unmistakable yellow-capped Coca-Cola bottles. What sets them apart is their designation as Kosher for Passover, ensuring that the soda enclosed adheres to the dietary regulations essential during this Jewish holiday.

    Kosher dietary laws are upheld throughout the year by Jewish individuals who adhere to a set of guidelines concerning permissible meats, methods of animal slaughter, and the separation of certain foods (like dairy and meat). During Passover, these dietary regulations become even more stringent for the eight days of the holiday, as all leavened foods are eliminated in commemoration of the hasty exodus of the Israelites from Egypt, where they had no time for their bread to rise.

    Why Some Coca-Cola Bottles Have Yellow Caps In The Spring

    Food that doesn’t meet the standards of Passover Kosher is referred to as chametz (pronounced ha-mets). Observant individuals who adhere to Kosher practices during Passover steer clear of chametz throughout the entire holiday, as well as anything that might have come into contact with these restricted ingredients. This encompasses all leavened products, such as bread and pastries. Flour and grains are only deemed acceptable if they are part of matzo that has received official certification as Kosher for Passover.

    As of this April, every 20-ounce Coca-Cola beverage will be housed in bottles crafted entirely from recycled materials, marking a significant stride towards sustainability. This transition is projected to yield monumental results, with an estimated 83 million pounds of plastic saved within Coca-Cola’s supply chain alone. To put it in perspective, that’s equivalent to two billion bottles spared from the production of new plastic.